Category First aid for cats

Poisonous Plants and Your Cat
First aid for cats

Poisonous Plants and Your Cat

Plants are attractive to cats. Though they're strict carnivores, cats seem to like the texture of certain plants, especially those that have grass-like leaves or fine texture, such as baby's breath, fine ferns and dried flowers. Some plants, such as the Easter lily, are serious poisons. Most will at least act as an emetic, which means your cat will vomit soon after eating.

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First aid for cats

Plants That Your Cat Shouldn’t Eat

Cats love plants. Though they're strict carnivores, cats like to eat plants even though doing so can make them ill. The consequences can range from simple vomiting to liver failures, seizures and even death. And while most animal species learn to stay away from things that make them sick, cats will eat plants over and over with the same results.
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First aid for cats

What To Do if You are Bitten by a Cat

What should you do if you are bitten by a cat? Cat bites are reported less often than dog bites however the number of cat bites that occur each year is believed to be high. Dog bite numbers are recorded as follows. According to the Centers for Disease Control, over 800,000 are bitten by dogs every year.
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First aid for cats

Winter Hazards for Cats

As winter approaches, we get our winter clothes out of storage, weatherproof our homes and limit our activity outdoors. We also begin to prepare for winter holidays. In addition to preparing ourselves for winter, providing a safe environment for our pets is also important. Outdoor Threats Some products that are used in the cold, icy wintertime have the potential to cause injury or illness to our pets.
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First aid for cats

Sending Flowers? Are They Safe?

Holidays, birthdays and even the occasional apology all have something in common – flowers. Cut flowers are a popular gift and are often found in the home. However, sometimes your pet may find the flowers very tempting and quite tasty. Listed below are 15 of the most popular cut flowers and their level of toxicity.
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First aid for cats

20 Common House Plants: Are They Dangerous to Your Cat?

House plants are popular additions to many rooms. Usually, plants and pets live together harmoniously, although some curious pets often venture to take a little taste. Listed below are 20 of the most popular houseplants and their levels of toxicity. Philodendron. Mildly toxic. Chewing or ingesting can result in irritation of the mouth and throat.
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First aid for cats

Inhaled Toxins in Cats

Pets can be poisoned by a number of ways. Besides ingesting toxic substances, they can breathe in toxins present in the air. The most common inhaled toxins are carbon monoxide and smoke from fires. Carbon monoxide is typically associated with confinement in a running vehicle but can also occur in a home with improper ventilation and faulty furnaces.
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First aid for cats

Poison Ivy or Poison Oak in Cats

Poison oak and poison ivy belong to the group of plants called toxicodendron species. These are also known as Rhus species. The toxic principle in poison oak and poison ivy is urushiol. This toxin is an oil resin found in the plant sap. Animals are quite resistant to the effects of urushiol but can transmit the toxin to a person.
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First aid for cats

Sago Palm Toxicity in Cats

Picture it: a sunny, sandy beach; a warm, tropical breeze; a comfortable lounge chair with a cool, refreshing drink enjoyed under swaying palm fronds. It may sound wonderful, but pet poisonings from the increasingly popular Sago Palm are on the rise. Palm trees have long been icons of the tropics, evoking images of an island paradise.
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First aid for cats

Spring and Summer Plant Toxicity in Cats

Holidays are often times that gifts are given. For some, flowers do not last long enough and a plant is a better, and longer lasting, gift. But if your family includes pets, you may want to learn which plants are safe and which to avoid. Springtime holidays are often associated with bulb plants and ingestion of the bulbs causes the most severe illness.
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First aid for cats

Poisonous Plants and Your Cat

Plants are attractive to cats. Though they're strict carnivores, cats seem to like the texture of certain plants, especially those that have grass-like leaves or fine texture, such as baby's breath, fine ferns and dried flowers. Some plants, such as the Easter lily, are serious poisons. Most will at least act as an emetic, which means your cat will vomit soon after eating.
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First aid for cats

Overdose and Toxicity in Cats

Care must be taken to follow your veterinarian's recommendations regarding medication administration. Problems associated with medication include allergic reactions, overdose and toxicity. Allergic reactions are uncommon. There is no way for your veterinarian to predict which medications your pet is allergic to so you must watch your pet carefully while on any medication, even the same medication he has received in the past.
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First aid for cats

Super Glue Toxicity (Super glue Ingestion) in Cats

Super glue is a common household item kept in kitchens and offices. Super glue is not among the top animal poisons, but cats may be exposed causing questions about their toxicity. There are several types of glue including white glue, super glue and expandable glues. The most toxic of these glues are the expandable glues.
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First aid for cats

Home Care of the Cat with an Ear Infection

An ear infection, also known by the medical term Otitis Externa in Cats (which means inflammation of the outer ear), is a common condition that may affect more than 20% of all cats. In fact, it is one of the top 20 reasons cats go to their veterinarian. Below are some common questions cat owners ask about ear infections.
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First aid for cats

Home Care for the Cat with Vomiting and Diarrhea

Vomiting and diarrhea are the most common symptoms seen in cats. They can occur alone or together. It can be a very minor self-limiting problem or a very significant major problem. Below are some common questions pet owners ask when their cat has vomiting and diarrhea. The focus of this article will be on how you can care for these problems at home.
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First aid for cats

Gasoline and Petroleum Toxicity in Cats

Gasoline and other petroleum products are not among the top animal poisons, but they can cause illness if ingested or exposed to the skin. The most common petroleum products associated with illness include motor oil, gasoline, kerosene, propane and diesel. Toxicity caused by petroleum products is based on the thinness and lightness of the product.
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First aid for cats

Is My Cat's Incision Healing Normally?

Your cat recently came home after having surgery. It is now up to you to make sure the incision heals properly. But how can you tell if the redness and swelling are part of a normal healing process or signs of trouble? Any breakdown of the skin, including wounds, lacerations and incisions, stimulate the body's immune system.
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First aid for cats

Dealing with Cat Hair

If cleaning up pet hair is part of your everyday life, there are some strategies that can help you reduce the amount of hair in your house, car, clothes and furniture. Pet hair can be a nuisance and even cause medical conditions, like allergies and asthma, to flare. Here are a few suggestions for controlling that endless pet hair.
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First aid for cats

Dealing with Cats Who Eat Plants

Anyone who has ever owned a cat will immediately recognize the thorny "problem" of plant eating. This behavior is not so much a problem for the cat as for the plant-loving cat owner - just as long as the plant is not toxic. Toxic plants, like Easter lilies, Oleander and Dieffenbachia, shouldn't be around unless the owner can assure that the cat will never be able to reach them.
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First aid for cats

First Aid Kit for Cats

Emergencies can occur any time and the best thing to do is be prepared. Having a first aid kit ready will help to reduce anxiety if an emergency does happen. Keep the kit readily available and periodically check to make sure all the items are up to date and present. A small plastic toolbox or fishing tackle box works well to hold all the necessary equipment.
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